Atlanta History Center

Apr 23

Looks like everyone at the Atlanta Woolen Mills daycare is about ready for the day to be over. c. 1904
Browse and order prints from our collection.

Looks like everyone at the Atlanta Woolen Mills daycare is about ready for the day to be over. c. 1904

Browse and order prints from our collection.

Azaleas are in bloom at the Atlanta History Center! Did you know that the AHC has 22 acres of gardens and trails?

Azaleas are in bloom at the Atlanta History Center! Did you know that the AHC has 22 acres of gardens and trails?

Apr 22

From the Archives: Civil War Letter

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Camp Lee Near Pollard Ala
April 22d, 1864
My Own Dear Julia
    Yours of the 17th was received to day. I was at Town + some person told me a letter had gon [sic] to camps for me. I attended to business with dispatch and hurried out as I began to think the time long in hearing from my several epistles that I had sent and my joy was complete when I received it and recognised [sic] the familiar hand writing. I new [sic] it contained some tidings from my Dear darling. I was truly glad to hear from you but sorry to hear that you was suffering from bad cold but I hope ere this time you are in the enjoyment of good health. and rosey as ever. I hope you + yours will still be blessed with good health. you have indeed been fortunate. I am fearful I am going to suffer considerably from Rhumatism [sic] this Spring. some days I can scarcely walk. I have been suffering a good deal to day but feel better this evening. I feel greatly distressed some times for fear I will yet loose the use of my limbs. it is Chronic and perhaps last me as long as I live. if I could remain at home I would resign but if I do so soon as I got better I would be conscripted. We are moveing [sic] to Town to day. 2 Regts are gone and ours + the 25 will go in the morning. all the Troops from here have been ordered to Dalton but our Brigade and we are left here to Guard the Road to Mobile +c. I hope we will get to remain here as there is not much danger of a fight here. Well Julia I am a child of misfortune. Col C. told Capt Hughes to write out my application as Adjt. before Capt H left + he said he thought the Col would be in command of the Regt in a few days and it would be better for him to send up the Application as the department would be more apt to act upon it. so thought all. Capt Harden came in. I made out my returns turned over all the effects in my hands and got Harden to write out the application + called on the Col to sign it and he very politely and to the astonishment of all refused to sign on the grounds that he had promised the place to Lt Bristol and their was a probability of his soon being exchanged + if he was he would give him the place + if not I should have it. I will know whether or not I will get the place by Monday next as Capt Bristol will be in soon and can let us know about the prospects of exchange. I was called on this morning to take the place. as politely as I knew declined unless I got the appointment and told them I had served in the Regt in nearly every capacity and here after I went by orders or appointment I did not intend to fill any more offices for accomodations [sic]. so wags the world. Capt Mount is absent on orders I received to hunt for lost Bagage [sic] + declars [sic] that he will secure the place for me yet. I am afflicted considerably with Rhumatism [sic] and fear that I never can march again on foot to do any good and am not afflicted enough to get a discharge or prevent being conscripted if I should resign. so you see I am in an unpleasant condition but I do not complain or even fret about it + make my self as comfortable and lively as any of them. I think Col C is determined that I shall remain as I am as I have allways [sic] to good a Whig to receive his caresses. dont fret about this little disappointment Julia. it will all work out for the best and I will still be an honerable [sic] Man. I wrote to Cousin Zeb by Capt Bristol if their was any chance to give me an appointment if cold but he is a relations and as a general thing Man gets few favors from his relatives so if I get no easier birth I will be agreeably disappointed. We have not drew a cent of money since I returned. I have been borowing [sic] all the time. I have got 4 yds Military cloth on the way 2 over shirts + 2 fine Blankets. I did not need them particularly but the state had them for us and if I remain in service I will need them but I fear our Goods are lost as thy [sic] was shiped [sic] from Raleigh on the 28th March and we hear of them passing Augusta Ga. Lt Whitaker will return about the 10 of May and I will then make an application for a Furlough and bring you all the Money I can spare. I feel distressed about your condition and fear that you would suffer if it was not for Mother. I do feel so grateful to her for her Kindness to me and my dear little Family. When I get my Debts paid I will have a better chance of sending you more as our Rations are now given to us.  we are now at our new camp near Town and evy [sic] thing is bustle + confusion putting up Tents making scaffolds beds + c. I am rejoiced to hear of the fine Daughter at Mr P. and glad to hear Jennie is doing so well + Mr. P. feels his importance. it is so natural for Parents to be proud of their offspring, but I feel very well satisfied that it is not so at our House during this war time. I am never disposed to complain at Gods providence and if I was at home quite likely I would wish to see the little fellows appear once + a while to lighten my heart, but I am content as it is, as we have 3 very interesting children and it seems that is as many as we can take care of now untill [sic] times get better and peace is made. So your old friend still is very communicative and attentive. it does seem she is getting very intimate and perhaps troublesome at times. I think I will be at home in May + June and I will make her fly arround [sic] and make her-self useful as well as ornamental. I think she is rather vain and dressed rather gay and paints too much to please her admirers notwithstanding she is very pleasant company at times. I would be so glad to see you and the children. I can imagine I see you flying arround [sic] attending to your little domestic affairs this evening preparing + fixing your-self + children for Sabbath School in the Morning. I would be so glad to be with and accompany you to church once more. it reminds me of by gon [sic] days when our cup was overflowing with happiness + pleasure and I read thos [sic] eyes of affection and trace your thoughts and with what pride you strove to render your-self agreeable + pleasant to the man that had promised at the sacred Alter to Cherish + protect you. I hope this cruel was will end this year and I be spared to enjoy uninterruptedly the society of Wife children + friends. We have been so successful this spring. if matters continue so this summer we certainly will have peace. Forrest took Fort Pillow Paduca Ky and our Armies was victorious in La recently and their is a great Battle now preparing at Dalton + in Ga. so if God only prosperous us their it will prevent Lincoln from being elected and perhaps being about an armistis [sic]. So you got a letter from Jane. I expect you had better write to Tomola [sic] as it is not very safe any where as that country is greatly overrun with Bush Whackers Tories + Yankees. Give them all my Love. I am just starting to a fish trap 6 or 8 Miles from Camps. will finish when I return. I did not get to go fishing. I am ordered to go to Sparta to night 28 Miles above here on a Board of Survey to condem [sic] some Government stock to morrow Sunday so I concluded to finish this letter and let it cut out to night and go with speed to my Lady Love. I bought a beautiful little ring the other day for Hettie. I will bring it when I come. I know she will be so proud of it. have you got a Sutler perchased [sic] combe [sic] that is worne [sic] out. if send it to me + I will have a nice Pin for you + Ma or rings just as you please. we have a good work man that makes beautiful Pins + rings. I must get something nice for Bascom + Charlie for going to Sunday School + being such good Boys. I was sorry to hear of you suffering so much from cold. the apology is sufficient for lack in writing. I will expect more next time but the last done very well. truly thankful for all such. I have not written to William. I certainly will shortly. so Fannie done the work for Billie. dont that beat bob tail. she is a great case indeed. Oh what would I do if I had such a fine wife as that. I would want the Battle field to be my grave yard. I must close as I have to take the Train at 9 oclock to night and have some clean clothes to put on. Joseph Pounders sends his love to you + the children. write as often you can. give my Lover to Ma + Sister Virginia + all the children and my best Respects to Mr. P. Miss Chattie and all the friends. if I succeed in getting the Adjt position I will let you know. good evening Dear Julia. may Heavens richest blessings be yours. As ever your loveing [sic]  + devoted Husband.
                                Jno M D
PS.    Save a chicken for me if you can as we get none in the Armey [sic]. tell Jennie that name she has selected reminds me too much of Aunt Maria. 

The AHC’s Swan House transformed into President Snow’s palace for The Hunger Games. Take a Capitol Tour and get the inside scoop on filming: http://ow.ly/w1AMF

The AHC’s Swan House transformed into President Snow’s palace for The Hunger Games. Take a Capitol Tour and get the inside scoop on filming: http://ow.ly/w1AMF

Apr 21

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Winship’s Iron Works Advertisement

In 1864, Georgia was home to the South’s most essential war industries. Hundreds of factories far from the front and safe from attack produced everything from guns, swords and bullets, to beltplates and cartridge boxes. Many of the factories were located in Atlanta, and nearly all of it was moved by rail through Atlanta. “We have been fighting Atlanta all of the time,” Sherman complained, “…capturing guns, and wagons, marked ATLANTA.” That’s why Sherman came to Georgia, and why Atlanta was his target.

Watch Episode 1

Georgia Public Broadcasting and the Atlanta History Center commemorate the 150th anniversary of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman’s 1864 march into Georgia with the original series, “37 Weeks: Sherman on the March.”

[video]

Apr 19

Easter poem written by Atlanta resident Imogene Buder in 1971. From the Imogene McAfee Buder Papers at the Atlanta History Center.

Easter poem written by Atlanta resident Imogene Buder in 1971. From the Imogene McAfee Buder Papers at the Atlanta History Center.

Apr 17

From the Archives: Civil War Letter

Atlanta Ga April 17th 1864
My own Dear Johnnie
    Yours of the 1st + 8th + 11th has all been received. for each and all accept my most sincere thanks. though they came pretty close to each other they were each none the less welcome + proved to me that you would embrace evry [sic] opportunity to write to me even though you are not due me a letter. I never have the pleasure of receiving your letters from the hands of those by whom you send them. I wish I could for I would like to see some one who received them from you hand, one who has just conversed with you, but by the time I get them the person is far on his way. They hand them over in the office.  they are send in to Ma + she sends them to me + I never know how long they will be here when they will leave nor anything about them only that they brought me a letter. I learned this morning at Mr P’s that there had been a battle at Shrevesport. I suppose you were not there though Mr P. said it was likely you had moved. I will send this any how. perhaps it will reach you. We have had very changeable weather for sometime rain + sunshine alternately + for several days quite cool. the sun shines warm today but the wind is cool + high. We went to Sabbath school but did not remain for church as I felt so bad have been suffering for several days with a bad cold. indeed all of us have a cold at present. so if you do not find this epistle very interesting just lay it to my cold. I received a letter from Jane the other day. they were all well, told me of the Feds visiting her + eating up her dinner in the pots. says Kilpatrick has gone to the Yankees left his wife in Nashville no doubt he sold my things + Billys for his own use. her post-office is Tomotla. shall I direct to Murphy or Tomotla?  Emelines health is still bad. Jane calls her babe Cora. My garden is not doing much yet. the weather has been so bad. I am going into it in the morning if I am not worse + put in some more seed. I fear I will have trouble with the chickens. I have no plank yet to finish the coop + have no way to keep them up. I have killed some + I want to keep one or two until you come home if you ever succeed in doing so. I must tell you the news before I go any farther. Jeny has a daughter + a fine one too + no mistake born the 12th the day after you wrote me by Capt Hughes + I was up there the 13th when I received it. She speaks of calling it Anna Maria. I called them this morning. she was sitting up + is doing as well as could be expected. indeed I think very well. Parrott is very proud indeed + I expect you would be proud although I know you are glad such is not the case with me + I am very well satisfied to remain as I am. My friend has not forsaken me.  indeed she comes too often to please me. I fear when summer comes that her visiting here so often in connection with my other labors will injure my health. she does not give me much trouble yet but you know a person is so much weaker in the heat of Summer + then to have company so often makes it that much worse. she was here last week again. Ma has advised me to tell her plainly that I can not have her come so often but as yet I have used no means to cause her to discontinue her visits. There has been some excitement in town among the printers Editors + c. the printers struck for higher wages. the Editors refused. no papers were issued for several days. they sent to Johnston’s Army for printers. do not know whether they succeeded or not. Mr P. sent you several papers did you get them. We received a letter from Lizzy.  they are nearly over the chills.  she says Fany diseased Billy sure enough.  it cost him $15.00 to get medicine for her.  She came to church the other Sunday with Mrs. Baggerly never spoke to her nor she to us. Have you written to Billy? Have you hard from Cousin Zeb. I still have some provisions though my meat is getting low. I am going out this week to see if I can not make a raise. I have not called on Goodson yet besides they owe me for milk. I hope I will get along some how. I still take in work + intend to have more for my work than heretofore or not do it. provisions have not come down. peas are $30.00 pr bu beef is $5.00 + 6.00 pr lb though I am not well posted not having bought any lately. If Mr. Fair had let me know he was going to camps I would have sent your things to you. he was talking about going home. I am so sory [sic] he did not come up again before he left. Where will Col C. go if he leaves your Brigade.
Oh I am so lonesome today. I am here alone only Hattie with me. everything is to still how I do wish my dear husband could be with me or I with him today. I wold [sic] have been very glad to have met you at Montgomery had it been possible, but in the first place I have not the money to go on + then if I had I would have had such a short time to stay with you that it would hardly justify the expense. If I have to go I would rather go all the way + then I would feel like I could stay some time but I hope + trust you will get home again soon. Ma talks of going to Salisbury in May. I wish you could be here while she is gone for I will feel lost without her + yet she wishes to be here when you come on account of trying to get planks to fix the house with. one more month + you will be three months away, as long as we have been seperated [sic] without seeing each other but you will just come when you can I know and as to sending me money I know you have done the best you could. I have not a word to say against you though I have had to depend on Ma. that hurts me worse than any thing else. she has furnished me with a good deal of money + the Good Being alone knows when I will be able to return it. some day I hope. she has indeed been very good to me. what I would have done without her I can not tell. May the Lord reward her. How are your shoulders + arms? have you made any arrangements about a horse. Have you received your appointment. I suppose Harden has not come in. Johny I do not feel able to answer your very interesting letter now as my cold wholly unfits me for the task as I merely scribble these few lines to inform you that it was received + that we are tolerable well +c.  You must write soon. give me all the news. Tender my compliments to Capt. Mount. My love to Joseph + receive a very large share for your own dear self. Good bye. Please write soon to your. Jeny + Ma send love to you. Miss Chattie also wished to be remembered.
                            Loving wife Julia D
Monday Morning. I am some better of my cold this morning + have been working in the garden. am not done as I have this scribble done I will not write any more. it is a poor apology for a letter, but will try + do better next time. let me hear from you soon. all are tolerable though I have not heard from Jeny today. suppose she is doing well.
                            Yours in Love Julia  

Apr 16

Atlanta rush hour traffic in 1940.
Browse and order prints from our collection.

Atlanta rush hour traffic in 1940.

Browse and order prints from our collection.

Apr 15

Playing basketball on a lot at 14th and Peachtree in Atlanta in 1902.
Left to right: (front row) Julia Porter, May DuBignon, and Josie Stockdell; (middle row) Florence Jackson, Nan DuBignon, Louise Black, Mary Ann Phelan, and Estelle Stewart; (back row) Sarah Calhoun, Louise Gay, Daisy Stewart, Anita Black, Ada Alexander, and Cordelia Gray.
Browse and order prints from our collection.

Playing basketball on a lot at 14th and Peachtree in Atlanta in 1902.

Left to right: (front row) Julia Porter, May DuBignon, and Josie Stockdell; (middle row) Florence Jackson, Nan DuBignon, Louise Black, Mary Ann Phelan, and Estelle Stewart; (back row) Sarah Calhoun, Louise Gay, Daisy Stewart, Anita Black, Ada Alexander, and Cordelia Gray.

Browse and order prints from our collection.

The dining room at Swan House transformed into President Snow’s dining room for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

The dining room at Swan House transformed into President Snow’s dining room for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

Apr 14

Agnes Scott College appointed student firefighters to protect their dormitories. In this 1913 photo, students are practicing how to put out a fire at Rebekah Scott Hall. 
Browse and order prints from our collection.

Agnes Scott College appointed student firefighters to protect their dormitories. In this 1913 photo, students are practicing how to put out a fire at Rebekah Scott Hall. 

Browse and order prints from our collection.

From the Archives: Civil War Letter

Camp Cobbs Georgia Legion
Near Charlottsville Virginia April the 14 64

L. B. Underwood
        Dear Father
I seat my self to write you a few lines to let you know whare [sic] we are we left bristol the 12 inst and after two days and a night travel on the cars we landed at Charlottesville Va Charlottesville is the capital of Albemarle County 7 miles from Richmond about 30 miles from Orange C. H. I. probley [sic] will get to see Jackey I hope + may see him before long I suppose Grant is a going to try Richmond but I think he will have a hard time of it I dont know whare [sic] we will go from hear [sic] our corps has not all go hear [sic] in a few days we probley [sic] will move when they all get hear [sic] Pa Fannie wrote me that you were sick which has trubble [sic] me ever sence [sic] it has been on my mind ever sence [sic] but I hope the next letter I receive will bring me better news that you are well write me all the news how wheat is and how money matters is with you all and the general news bud said that you and uncle Fayett had gone into bisness [sic] how you are geting [sic] along with it + c I must come to a close write soon
A. C. Underwood

Apr 10

[video]

It pollened in Atlanta this morning!

It pollened in Atlanta this morning!